* Another rubric for recess

In a previous post, I shared a recess rubric for students on the autism spectrum.  Here is one that may be helpful for students with a learning disability, especially twice exceptional (2e) kiddos.  These kids are often desperate to get out of the classroom, away from tremendous stress (and boredom, in the case of 2e kids).  Why would LD kids benefit from a recess rubric?   Again, stress.  They often feel stupid and invalidated in a classroom, no matter how smart they may be, no matter how supportive their teachers are.  When they hit the playground, these students are often over-eager to show off athletic skills.  They may vent their frustration on peers or withdraw from the group altogether.  Social skills intervention is helpful when LD students find themselves in constant conflict at recess.  Remember that you cannot toss a rubric at a student and expect it to “work.”  Kids need to rehearse needed skills and rubrics should be modified to match individual needs.  A rubric can be used to measure progress over time, which is very important for kids who face an uphill battle with academics.

rubric-for-enjoying-recess

* Should kids do schoolwork during a break?

calendar 2Schoolwork during the winter break?  What?  As one kid said to me, “Are you kidding?”  If you’ve followed this blog, you know I am generally opposed to daily homework.  But working during a school break, especially one that is two weeks long, has its benefits.  Who could benefit from schoolwork during a break?  And where would this work come from?

For kids who lag far behind their peers:  These are usually kids with learning disabilities who need to invest strategically-timed effort to reduce that gap and retain skills.  They are kids who are very much aware of their memory weaknesses and have the motivation to keep going.  The work is individualized and includes much computer-based instruction.  This plan works well for students if their parents have to leave them in the care of older siblings or other caregiver.  Students in this category typically earn a reward for completing assignments.  They may check in with me during the break.

For kids who need a consistent routine:  I’ve created work packets for kids on the autism spectrum who do well with some “schoolwork” time during a break.  These are the kids who are at loose ends without their usual school day (and their parents, may start to unravel, as well).  The packets are filled with familiar drills, activities, and personal messages from me.  In fact, in coordination with their parents, if the work comes from me, the kids will do it.  Otherwise, all bets are off.  The goal of these packets is not so much academic as it is functional.  The packets typically include links to computer-based instruction as well.  Not all ASD kids will respond well to this plan, especially those twice exceptional kids (see below), but it’s been very helpful for some.

Which kids do not benefit from schoolwork during a long break?

Kids who are burned out from school work.  These are often the kids who are also anxious about their school performance.  Twice exceptional kids typically fall in this group.  The last thing they need is a reminder of dreaded school days.  Instead, they should occupy their time with lots of physical activity and special interests.  This population is already at risk for melting down before school ends, so they need to “forget” about school for a while.

One note: These guidelines are for a two-week break.  The longer summer break has unique pros and cons for many special needs kids.

* What a difference a day makes…

The child in this blog has a truly wonderful mom! It’s a poignant but courageous post. Read on….

unitedinsite

I was full of joy two days ago, happy as a lark. Next day my little bubble burst a bit, the wind definitely out of my sails. I was told that Canon has got a learning difficulty alongside his autism. Whoa what? You mean my little one who is not freaking out at school, saying Canon when you ask his name and saying guuuuuud thumbs up when you ask him how he is. No. Can’t bear it.

The thing is I can see it, I don’t know the difference between autism and learning difficulties but I can see that he is just not really picking up stuff like we thought he might. Colours, names, objects. How any times have we tried to teach him colours? Yesterday as standard… Look Canon yellow car, red car, yellow car, red car (pointing them out) now asking him to copy.. Red car… Red car…

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