* Overcoming ADHD and more

Thanks, David Snape, for this post.  Colin’s mom writes poetry about her son’s battle to walk, keep up with his peers, and daily struggle with ADHD.  Check it out!

Originally posted on God is in your typewriter: My son Collin, a gifted student in the 2nd grade, won the county-wide haiku contest, beating out all students in the county up to 5th grade. Collin has been diagnosed with ADHD, a daily struggle for him. We have overcome, by the blood of the lamb and…

via For the God I love — David Snape and Friends – The place to show off your hidden talents

* A dystopian short story — David Snape and Friends – The place to show off your hidden talents

Originally posted on The Amazing Life of I: Okay so every now and then I write so here’s a fairly recent piece. I’m making toast when I hear the door clunk open. A familiar figure appears in the doorframe, a lab coat three sizes too large draped over his slight frame. “Long time no see!”…

via A dystopian short story — David Snape and Friends – The place to show off your hidden talents

I really love this story!  Very clever and see how few words he used to create a powerful and complex tale!

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* Continuing the Liebster process

James O’Neil kindly nominated me for the Liebster award, which I had already received but who would want to miss out on the fun of nominating their personal favorite bloggers?  I had planned to post this a lot sooner but have been sick.

I am to answer James’ questions and and since I think the questions are terrific, I’m passing them on to my nominees:   Group by GroupFaraday’s Candle (who are currently on vacation),  David Snape and Friends,  Staycation Atlanta, and Vamp It Up Manchester.   Then these folks get to create their own set of questions. (Or borrow James” great set?)

  1. Which sex do you think has it easier in your culture?  If we look at salaries and powerful positions, men still have the advantage.  Especially white men.
  2. What is your most treasured memory?  Meeting my dearest widower as a 19 year old in community college.  He smiled and my heart was captivated.
  3. For a person you loved deeply, would you be willing to move to a distant country knowing there would be little chance of seeing your friends or family again?  Definitely for my dearest widower.  Fortunately, he is not interested in moving anywhere.
  4. For what in your life do you feel most grateful?  Being pursued and loved by Jesus.
  5. What makes you angry?  Racism and bullying.
  6. Did your schooling connect to your life?  So much so that I became a teacher for life!
  7. Have you seen a good movie lately?  What made it good?  Not too many good movies around.  I like sci fi, action, and spy thrillers.  I recently took a squad of kiddos to Zootopia and the animation is terrific.
  8. Who is the most important person in your life today?  My dearest teaching widower.
  9. What is the greatest accomplishment of your life?   Teaching and loving kids.
  10. Given the choice of anyone in the world, whom would you want as your dinner guest?   Friends and family.
  11. What do you like best about your life?   That I am loved by my widower and my heavenly Father.liebster-award

* When Harry met Chelsea by Chelsea Freund

Oh my! This is one of the sweetest, funniest, and saddest posts I’ve read in a while. The author is truly hilarious while living through enough difficulties that would slay a lesser woman. If you are a unicorn, please send her a message! You MUST read it all!

David Snape Show - Bourne and Beyond

I frequently refer to online dating as “shopping for men.” I have my list of attributes I’d like to find in a mate, and the men have their own lists. The “stores” I frequent are OKCupid and Match.

I have made a concerted effort to fill out my profiles as much as possible, including being up front about being tethered to my apartment because of this crazy rare disease. I am also constantly editing; some days I’m afraid I’m stuck too far on the side of serious, others I just want to let my freak flag fly and admit that I like to eat my food in bite-sized pieces (think M&M’s, peas, berries – all eaten one by one rather than in spoonfuls).

This past week my uncle visited me and we played a couple of rounds of cribbage and caught up on each other’s lives. He has stage IV…

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* Why Our Resolutions Are So Last Season…

Jacqueline has captured a lot of wisdom here. Living in the moment, not deceived by the lures of fame and glory, but seeking a lifestyle of living with integrity. Good words to live by.

a cooking pot and twisted tales

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We are trying too hard. We are not trying hard enough.

At certain points reminders of where one failed or didn’t get it right pops up.

The usual nag of the annoying voice even sometimes says ‘why bother?’ Since we can’t have what we want instantly; better jobs, excellent health, abs to die for, a wonderful partner, more money, fame, fabulous lifestyles and the whole nine yards – since it is life in the digital century – we feel deflated and defeated.

The inner critic hoots and snickers and smirks at our ambitious attempts to set those 30 years worth of resolutions aright.

But hang on! Just wait a minute. Why the fall backs, the lapses, the frustration, the giving in and giving up, most especially with our New Year resolutions?

I have spent weeks dwelling on the concept of resolution. What it entails and I am sure there…

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* Working with Big Bad Autism by Cambria Jenkins 

Here is an adult perspective on growing up with autism. It think it’s helpful for us to remember that stereotypes about autism still abound. Cambria suffered from the stigma associated with “stimming.” Like her, I have found it far better to provide an adaptation of self-stimulation that works to allay stress but also lessens its impact on social relationships. Is it hypocritical to respond to social pressures that way? For the students involved, it was a pragmatic solution which helped them make friends more easily.

David Snape Show - Bourne and Beyond

Reading blog article after blog article on how autistic people who were treated with Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy had Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), and I myself, being older, and not subjected to it, turning out passing for neurotypical to most people, I have come to a conclusion: Applied Behavior Analysis and its cruel carrot-holding practices of reward and punishment for neurotypical behavior does not work. So many people have “amputated” themselves from their families for using ABA therapy. I’m sure many people will object to the above statements, but it will mostly be concern trolling…i.e. harrassing a person with an undesirable trait “for their own good.” (You may say it’s for their own good, but it’s mostly for your own fear and hate.) Instead of fighting and trying to minimize autism, why not work with the autism to achieve the results of functioning in this world? It will lead…

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