* The Great War channel

the great war channel

If you are looking for a fabulous resource for World War 1, I highly recommend The Great War YouTube channel.  Written and hosted by Indy Neidell, this is a terrific week-by-week series of “the war to end all wars.”  It is well-researched, engaging, and provides abundant primary source materials such as maps, films, and photos.  Even though we know the outcome (spoiler alert!), the tension of the actual war does bleed through.  So does Indy’s heartfelt compassion for those poor soldiers.  His coverage of the Armenian genocide is incredibly moving.  Indy also captures the desperation of the millions of people who were forced to evacuate their homelands as wartime fronts shifted.

I would recommend this Great War series for middle school and up.  I do block the screen for most images of dead bodies, of which there are many.  There are a few that I allow, since dead bodies are a major “component” of the war.  The genocide photos are very difficult to view, and I have skipped a couple of other episodes which are too mature for middle school.

The Great War channel helps viewers understand the politics and propaganda, the incompetence of many military leaders, and the despair of millions.  Can you imagine heading to the eastern front, waiting for a soldier to die so you have a gun?  Or drowning in your trench on the western front?  Or a majority of your fellow soldiers freezing to death before you even fight?

Finally, The Great War channel has numerous special episodes featuring important aspects of that era, such as technology, famous persons, wartime animals, tanks, and more.  They also provide regular summaries.

What’s the advantage for special needs students?  The videos are quality made, can be stopped at key points, and viewed as often as needed.  Each is about 9 minutes long, which is a reasonable length of time for the middle and high school brain.  I set the speed of of the video to 75% to allow for a slower pace of listening (but they could be sped up slightly for those kiddos who have a long period of adaptation to audio materials).  I also provide a preview of each video to allow brains to file new information more efficiently.  Indy does a superb job of reviewing the previous week and then summarizing the current film.  You would need to watch a couple per school day to complete the series in a school year.  Homeschoolers might have an advantage with a more flexible schedule.

You can support The Great War channel through Patreon- and that’s a great idea, too!

* Lions and tigers and WATER BEARS, oh my!

Yes, water bears, or tardigrades, are THE most adorable microorganisms I’ve seen.  And your students can see them as well, with a relatively inexpensive digital microscope, a steady hand, and a jar of these babies from Carolina Biological Supply.  (You can find them outside, most likely on moss, but ordering them was more of a certainty.)

The tardigrade journey for me started with Live Science‘s review of kid microscopes.  These scopes can provide some cool images of tardigrades, but what if your students have visual or physical disabilities that prevent them from leaning over a microscope to peer through the lens?

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a professional image from Storyblocks

I purchased the Teslong USB microscope from Amazon, which magnifies the little critters up to 200x.  Not as clear as the professional image above, but how much fun it is to slowly drag the waterproof scope through algae and find these little critters swimming and eating and pooping!  A great plus is the use of a camera app that allows your kiddos to see them full screen.  You should try this miniature safari through a watery forest with your kiddos!

Here is a 9 second portion of a video I took with a student.  We were totally enthralled.  And the science fun continues.  Tardigrades are extremely hardy and can survive in a vacuum and even boiling water.  Our little jar is now filled with water bear poop (they remind me of guinea pigs), but we still hunt them down for photos and videos.  Enjoy!

* Ranger Rick grows online!

Wow!  Ranger Rick has hit the web big time!  I reviewed this kids’ National Wildlife Federation magazine a couple of years ago and can now share its online splash with my readers.  Ranger Rick’s online presence adds a lot to what educators and their students can do with the magazine.  Each month’s publication of Ranger Rick (ages 7-12), Ranger Rick Junior (4-7), and Ranger Rick Cub (0-4) is available online.  Although I’m subscribed to Ranger Rick, I can also view the current issue of Junior and a sample of Cub.  All three magazines are top quality, encouraging engagement with science concepts, divergent thinking, exposure and practice with science vocabulary, and fun activities.

Ranger Rick online

For only $5 a year, you can access your Ranger Rick magazine subscription, play online games, engage in craft and suggested outdoor activities, enjoy almost 1500 jokes and riddles, watch videos, and enter the monthly photo contest.  The volume (90+) and quality of animal videos is striking, as are the 300+ animal pages.  The online games range from completing photo puzzles or trying to survive as a fish in the ocean, to getting a squirrel to the bird feeder and solving word searches.  The shop is full of gift ideas, teaching materials, apparel, and apps.  More on those later!

With that single membership, teachers can review detailed lesson guides for each issue, along with downloadable worksheets.  Previous issues are archived for easy access.  The worksheets I saw involved higher level thinking skills and continued use of science vocabulary, which is key to fluent reading in subject areas.

What is helpful to special needs students?  A lot! 

  • The online access will be appealing to kiddos who love their tech gizmos.  The games do not all have timed features and range widely in difficulty.
  • The clear photos and videos will allow students to focus easily on the topic at hand.  Like the paper version, online Ranger Rick minimizes visual clutter.
  • A major advantage of the online version is the typed version of each article (in addition to snapshots of the pages).  Students with reading challenges will appreciate this plain, well-spaced type on a white background.  Some devices most likely read the type out loud, too.
  • A simple click on the page snapshots opens to a fullscreen image of that page, which allows for clearer photos of the featured animals, along with the original text.  This could be used to scaffold from plain type to the more colorful pages of the magazine.
  • Links to interesting, related videos are also clear.

Online Ranger Rick gives you a lot of bang for your five bucks.  Check it out!

* Science Wiz: Inventions

Looking for the perfect gift for kiddos who enjoy science and gadgets that spin and whir?  Want to jumpstart your young inventor?  Penny Norman’s Science Wiz kit, Inventions, is sure to please.  This kit is a highly acclaimed book-manual-kit for kids 8 and up, although young hands will need a bit of support from adults.

What makes this kit so special?  It has fabulous illustrations to support the creation of devices from simple to complex, helps kids understand why and how these inventions work, and is loaded with everything you need to complete the projects (except for one D battery).

I used this kit with a budding, special needs inventor and we completed all the inventions, including a working radio.  OK, the radio only picked up static, but that was pretty impressive for a paper towel tube and a myriad of wires.

radio

As I’ve mentioned before, providing opportunities to excel in science can add social credit to kids who are on the fringes of a classroom.  Taking a radio like this to school would likely be fascinating to peers (and teachers!).

 

* Impact Jack

This post is for Cee’s Black and White photography challenge and for my evaluation of a science kit for kids.  Impact Jack is a SmartLab Toys “Crash Test Lab,” featuring a virtually indestructible Jack.

Impact Jack 2

The premise and design of the kit is well done.  Kids aged 8+ can (fairly) easily assemble the crash test vehicle and then experiment with the effect of a seat belt, roll bars, bumpers, etc.  The kit comes with a colorful fold-out of directions, experiments related to Newton’s Laws of Motion, and other suggestions for Jack as a crash test dummy.  It’s a bit hard to see in the photo above, but Jack has a glowing “I’m alive!” button on his chest which will turn red if he doesn’t survive the impact.

My primary concern is that Jack is virtually immortal.  A student and I rammed the car numerous times with a force that should have had led to hospitalization, if not a coffin.  I took Impact Jack back to the toy store where the sales clerk dropped/slammed him on the counter and Jack glowed red.  I was offered a refund since I had trouble replicating that force, but decided to give it another try in his vehicle.  Jack ALWAYS survived his car crashes but finally passed away when I body-slammed him into a wall.

I would purchase this kit again but not for use with students who startle easily at the loud sounds which accompany the only way to make a true impact on Jack.  Impact Jack is a terrific toy for kids who are extremely rough with their playthings.

* Virtual field trips this Thanksgiving!

Virtual field trips are an excellent online resource for visiting sites that would otherwise be out of reach.  To celebrate Thanksgiving with your students or kiddos at home, take advantage of Scholastic’s terrific resources for Thanksgiving.  Here’s a snip of their virtual field trips, enhanced with reenactments.  I appreciate the relatively uncluttered look and ease of access.

Virtual field trip

And that’s not all!  To promote a better understanding of the lives of the native peoples and colonists, use Scholastic’s comparison pages.  Students can listen independently and research housing, clothes, chores, school. and games in order to compare and contrast theses two lifestyles.  For students with reading disabilities or those who learn best by seeing what they hear, these resources-and more- are an excellent tool for exploring our nation’s Thanksgiving holiday.

Virtual field trip 2

Check out Scholastic for more super resources!

* “Skywalkers”

Skywalkers: Mohawk Ironworkers Build the City” is not about Luke or other sci fi characters.  It’s a terrific nonfiction read on the role of the Mohawk people in building our country’s skyscrapers- and much more.  Written for middle to high school plus, this book is a surprising page-turner.  The author, David Weitzman, takes us from the early culture of the Mohawk people to their present day role as ironworkers and bridge builders.

Skywalkers

This book is fascinating, with marvelous photographs dating back to the 1800s.  Weitzman’s use of primary source info, such as interviews and written commentaries, bring each chapter to life.  For kiddos who are curious about construction, native peoples, bridge disasters, and more, this book is riveting (pun intended)!  The author explores myths and legends about the famous Mohawk ironworkers, including the sobering realities of building our cities.  You will be amazed at the skills, the sacrifices, and the grit of these people.  While this book has a social studies emphasis, it also presents the complex math of construction and the role of engineers and architects.  “Skywalkers” will forever change the way you view our city skylines.

In case you’re wondering how I found this gem, it was recommended reading for Camp Wonderopolis 2017.  You can check out that site for other books with a STEM focus.

* Camp Wonderopolis 2017- WOW!

Camp Wonderopolis 2017 is the BEST ever!   This STEM-based set of activities is divided into six tracks, with 7 excellent lessons for each.  New this year: Each track also includes a Maker Activity, a hands-on, fun way to extend the primary concept of each track.  A helpful video also accompanies each Activity.  The creators of this Wonderful camp have added a slew of additional resources for each lesson, access to a Wonder Wall for posting comments, and a cool representation of progress (such as completion of a graphic power plant) in addition to the previous representations of completion.  Kids still earn those awesome Wonder Cards by taking a 6-question quiz related to the basic concepts and vocabulary of the lesson.

Camp Wonderopolis 2017

Kids with reading struggles are not neglected.  Each lesson features an audio track, so those smart kids who can’t wade through paragraphs of unfamiliar words won’t have to!  Kids on the autism spectrum or those with language/ auditory processing problems may also benefit from the audio and video features, as well as time spent on “Spin a Wonder Wheel,” which reviews key vocabulary.

So here’s my Wonder question:  How do they keep making Camp Wonderopolis better each year?  

* Past and Present

Check out this terrific book by Group by Group on past and present ways to play, travel, and more.  This blog features great free materials for kids with special needs.  Here’s a snippet of a page from Past and Present.

past-to-present

“In keeping with the Unique theme for this month, we are talking about things from the past and things from the present.  Our book features several of our students and staff showing how things have changed from the past to the present.

It was really neat to compare the older pictures with the recent ones.  Check it out to see how much things have changed!”

via Past and Present — Group by Group

Dash and Dot

dash-and-dot

Sounds like Morse code, right?  These two robots are waaaaay beyond that (in the photo, Dash is hogging the camera and Dot is waiting for a turn).   Created by Wonder Workshop, these programmable robots are fun for play and teaching kids coding.  Dot is a stationary robot with a multitude of expressions and lights.  One spontaneous phrase of hers is, “I love it when you hold me,” spoken like she really means it.  Dash is a wild one with enough moves to star in a TV talent show.  Both robots interact with their owners (and each other) right off the bat, but they were created to help kids learn programming.  They’re spunky toys, very durable and personable.  Hey, they almost seem ALIVE.

Where do you begin with these fascinating characters?  First, be prepared to fork out serious cash for Dash.  Dash is the more complex of the two robots, with its ability to move around.  Wonder Workshop also sells Dash with an array of accessories, including launchers, Legos, and xylophones.  I think the robots are worth every penny because they are not a one-and-done type of toy.  Kids will continue to enjoy the endless possibilities long after the holiday season or birthday party.

The next step is to load the Wonder Workshop free apps on your  iOS or Android device.  There’s an app for all ages and abilities.  Dot and Dash are toys that will “grow up” along with your kids.  My favorite app is Wonder, for ages 8+.  Here’s a screenshot of all the goodies available (yes, parents may be fighting with their kids to play).  A cool feature is sharing and downloading codes from the Wonder Cloud which the robots will remember after you turn off the app.  The Scroll Quest teaches kids coding with all kinds of advanced techniques/conditions.

Wonder screenshot.PNG

These robots may be the first step of a child’s future career in technology.  They are designed for kids, but you can enjoy the fun together.  In fact, your kiddo will probably drive Dash into your ankles if you don’t pay attention to their latest trick!