* Blogging A-Z: ASCD

ASCD, Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, has a lot to offer teachers as well as administrators.  The organization was founded in 1943 and has continually provided high quality professional development, current research and issues, along with a commitment to improve education, one child at a time.

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How does this play out for special needs kids?  ASCD supports a positive approach to neurodiversity, which means celebrating learning differences and improving students’ ability to understand their unique strengths.  This also means less emphasis upon labeling/pathology, less test-driven assessment, and more technological support for struggling students.  With state and federal monies dependent upon labels, is this possible?  Certainly!  Most elementary students are oblivious to the behind-the-scenes labeling process.  As they mature, students can participate in that process with a secure awareness that there is no average learner.

Check out the membership options for ASCD.  You’ll be glad you did!

* Lose the lecture?

lecture.jpgIn the latest edition of Stanford, an alumni publication, atomic physicist Carl Wieman examines the differences in student performance between sit-and-listen versus hands-on, problem solving.  (Sam Scott writes the article entitled “Should We Lose the Lecture?”)  No question about the results.  Students who actively participated in classes FAR outperformed their peers, even when the teacher was much more highly qualified.

So here’s the kicker: These studies were conducted at the graduate level of education!  Research at the elementary, middle, and high school levels confirms that our brains simply can’t absorb such lengthy chunks of information.  And we also need to actively interact with information (and our peers) to get the most out of instruction.

As teachers and students, we intuitively know this to be true.  Yet in our practice, it feels expedient to lecture, lecture, lecture.  Unless we are quite deliberate in structuring short chunks of information followed by authentic student interaction, we will overload our kids’ brains.  Being a highly qualified teacher means losing the lecture.

 

* Color your world desert sand…

… And have fun with programming at the same time!  This is the game board for a ThinkFun game for preschoolers called Robot Turtles.

Robot TurtlesIt’s never too early to play logic (aka coding) games and if you are trying to steer clear of screens with your younger ones or even introduce the joys of hands-on games to older kiddos, ThinkFun is a terrific resource.  A local toy store keeps us supplied with some of their classics, but you’ll probably have to go online to check out their wealth of problem- solving games.  The availability of non-screen games is shrinking, so it’s ironic that you need your screen to purchase hands-on fun.

I highly recommend ThinkFun as a source of individual and group entertainment, with brain challenges galore.  Does your kiddo have social skill challenges?  The structure of a group game can provide a satisfying, well-defined opportunity to engage with others.  Try Escape the Room mystery game (ages 10+). where you are transported back to 1869 to save a local astronomer.  These games are terrific for parties as well as family night fun.  Have a long car trip in your future?  ThinkFun has a number of fascinating 1 player games, too.

Thanks, Jennifer Nicole Wells, for your Color Your World challenge featuring desert sand.

* Ummy! Video downloader

In a not-so-recent post, I mentioned that I’m using the awesome Tobii Dynavox I-12 device with Communicator 5.  One of Com 5’s cool features is the creation of page sets that allow links to even more links.  This means the homepage can be simple, but each link allows more choices.  Here’s a look at a home page (sorry for the picture quality):

homepage-1

Before UMMY, “brain break” in the school page has been linked to pictures of a student’s favorite YouTube videos, but then we have to open YouTube, etc.  Brain breaks are serious business and support improved student learning, but they also need to be efficient.  This is where UMMY makes good things happen!  I just discovered the Ummy video downloader, which allows me to access and create links to the actual YouTube videos.  Wow!  For $14.95, I now have unlimited downloads, it’s a snap to use, and allows me to choose from a variety of formats.  I love the HD quality as well as the sound.  [I had a free trial with another downloader, but it was going to cost a big chunk every month and in 5 days, I couldn’t get one video downloaded.  Granted, my brain has had its challenges this past week, but even a digital novice can get Ummy to work!]

If you want easy and cheap access to unlimited and high quality video downloads, Ummy is a winner.  It’s going to make school transitions easier and my student’s life more fun.  For classroom teaching, you can ALWAYS access your Ummy videos with a simple click, even without internet availability.  Be sure to check it out!

* Brain-friendly spelling

What does neuroscience tell us about spelling instruction?  An excellent resource for understanding brain-friendly teaching in this area is “The Best of Corwin: Educational Neuroscience,” edited by David Sousa.  (Corwin has been at the forefront of educational research for many years; click on the link to access webinars, free resources, and more.)

educational-neuroscience

In her chapter on The Literate Brain, Pamela Nevills reiterates what we already know.  Memorizing a set of words each week is NOT the way to develop capable spellers.  Instead, she suggests a sequence of skills by grade level.  These are also paired with reading instruction on the same skills.

  • Kindergarten- letter-sound associations
  • First grade- vowel sounds with decodable words, along with exceptions
  • Second grade- complex vowel and consonant patterns
  • Third grade- multisyllabic words, the wonderful schwa (unaccented syllables), and common prefixes and suffixes
  • Fourth grade- Latin-based prefixes, suffixes, and roots
  • Fifth through eighth grade- Greek roots and content vocabulary.

Nevills asserts that only about 4% of English words cannot be spelled using predictable spelling patterns and those are best learned through repetition and memory.  My experience confirms that estimate.  For struggling readers and writers, this is great news!  Students who learn spelling and syllable rules early and systematically actually change the structure of their neural pathways.

What are the implications for classroom and special education teachers?  Learn these rules and patterns for yourself and your kiddos.  There are many available resources online.  Encourage your PLC or grade level team to incorporate these skills into reading instruction.  Reading instruction, especially decoding words, does not end at third grade!  A bonus for teachers in Educational Neuroscience:  Each section provides student demystification of our brain processes for that topic, including a scripted discussion starter.

I’ll share more about this terrific resource in later posts.  

* Christopher and me: brain breaks

I’ve been asked how to keep a young’un attentive during summer tutoring, especially one with special needs.  My nephew, Christopher, is such a joy to teach, but he does get tired, off track, antsy, and frustrated at times.  As I’ve mentioned in previous posts, he’s an ASD (A Sweet Dude) kiddo .  Here’s what I do:

  • Keep a visual schedule so he knows when we will take brain breaks.
  • Take a variety of brain breaks, including going outside for a few minutes to toss a minion (below) or to attempt hula hooping.
  • Encourage him to stand up as we work, if he looks fatigued.
  • Give him something to fidget with.
  • Keep the activities focused on his special interests.
  • Tally every off-task remark and praise him for the improvements he’s made as we work.  Many times, simply tallying or graphing is sufficient with kids.  No need for a reward, but…
  • Establish a small reward of his choice for each of our 3 major activities (thinking/language, writing, reading).  For example, he loves a sour small candy, so he’s gotten 3 miniature pieces after each session of working hard.  He DOES work hard all the time anyway, which I find very typical of kids on the autism spectrum.
  • Provide a larger reward for longer and more difficult assignments which may take a week to earn.  These are typically the “thinking” activities related to problem solving.
  • Stay playful.  We DO get off track and although I sneak in some language work as we banter, he needs to enjoy himself with those wild and crazy thoughts of blowing noses, beating Super Mario Bros, or endless discussions of “comic mischief.”

(Hover mouse to read captions.)

* Gaming plus a ZAP?

sticky notesWill playing video games improve working memory?  Neuroscientists are examining the claims made by a number of cognitive training programs, with an eye to improving working memory in aging adults as well as youngsters with learning challenges. Why working memory?  It is a strong predictor of educational success.  (And it helps me remember why I trekked upstairs.)

A recent article in Brain in the News (written by Lisa Munoz for the Cognitive Neuroscience Society) reports that scientists have shocking news: apparent long-lasting benefits in working memory when a mild current (tDCS) is passed through the brain.  John Jonides, one of many researchers exploring how video games might improve working memory, reports that they tried the tDCS current “as a lark, not expecting to find much, but the fact that the training effect lasts as long as months is both surprising and very provocative because it opens up the use of tDCS for long-term learning enhancement.”

Jonides’ team is now studying two currents “to boost plasticity in the underlying brain cortex.”  His goal is to “accelerate the learning process that occurs during game play, especially for those individuals with damage.”  This is encouraging news, giving me hope that some day, weaknesses in working memory may be addressed efficiently and permanently.

Sign me up!  I am tired of wandering around, wondering what I was doing in the first place.  I might even start playing Hearts again!

* Everything I know, I learned from…

Speech Therapists!  That’s a slight exaggeration, but not far from the truth.  I have been blessed by the advice and mentoring of many excellent speech and language pathologists.  Why has their advice been so crucial?  They understand and work at the deepest levels of understanding, helping kids process information.  Speech therapists demonstrate how systematic and carefully sequenced instruction transforms language, which is at the core of most academic and social learning.

It was a speech therapist who first shared the TOPS 3 Elementary Tests of Problems Solving with me.  This test assesses critical thinking based on students’ language strategies, logic, and experiences.  For students with dyslexia and those on the autism spectrum, these language-based skills are sometimes assumed to exist and therefore receive cursory instruction.  For this reason, I’ve used the Tasks of Problem Solving workbook by Bowers et al. for social skills and reading comprehension instruction (see related post), as well as for specific skill remediation.

Tasks of Problem Solving

This workbook includes a description of the following skills with useful tasks of increasing difficulty.  Many of the lessons include visual cues (or these can be easily created).  It is quite simple to adapt any lesson to student interests and needs:

  • Identifying problems
  • Determining causes
  • Sequencing
  • Negative questions
  • Predicting
  • Making inferences
  • Problem solving
  • Justifying opinions
  • Generalizing skills

One caveat: Years ago, after observing me in the classroom, a speech therapist strongly advised me to speak more s-l-o-w-l-y.  I’m still working on that skill!

* InspirED by EQ.org

I stumbled across an intriguing website, EQ.org, and found myself cheering!  This site offers educators an opportunity to improve their own EQ (emotional quotient/intelligence) and that of their students.  In fact, it’s hard to imagine teaching students to improve their social emotional intelligence without having a grasp on it yourself.  meditation-651411_960_720

 

The inspirED educator toolbox offers three modules on becoming an EQ educator.  The module on improving classroom EQ is particularly interesting, including topics such as how to reduce boredom in the classroom and assessing the emotional climate of your class.  All their practical suggestions seem congruent with the latest neuroscience findings on how kids learn best.  For those teachers who are already aware of brain-friendly strategies, these modules are a great reminder to USE them.  I need those reminders myself!  The EQ site also offer links to several other free courses on improving your understanding of social emotional learning.

It’s been years since researchers validated what we know intuitively: kids with better relationship and emotional skills are more likely to succeed, regardless of their intellectual prowess.  In “The Case for Emotional Intelligence in Our Schools,” Joshua Freedman writes: Several organizations have emerged to help schools and organizations implement emotional intelligence and social-emotional learning programs, including The Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL), The George Lucas Educational Foundation (GLEF), The Center for Social Emotional Learning, CSEE, and Six Seconds, The Emotional Intelligence Network. 

Six Seconds, the parent organization behind EQ.org, has a stated goal of “working toward one billion people practicing emotional intelligence.”  They offer certification in their methodology, an online store for materials (and kid-friendly games), training for organizations, scholarships, and grants.  As schools struggle to eliminate the racial achievement gap, this type of intervention could prove effective. Schools should be a safe place for kids of all races.

* For Me, Dyspraxia is Normal!

Chrissie has nailed it again! Her post is a terrific essay on self-validation. She is not cursed and not broken. Chrissie comments that at least people now acknowledge that dyspraxia is REAL, after a long struggle to be acknowledged and accepted as she is. I especially admire how she appreciates the unique hardwiring of her brain, reminding us that we are all wired differently. Go, Chrissie!

Vamp It Up Manchester

Yet again the family member has automatically tried to dismiss my Dyspraxia as if trying to play down a large spot someone has suddenly acquired. They have done this my entire life – before I was diagnosed but knew something was different about me and now even after.

I set my alarm and actually got ready an entire hour earlier than I needed to because I got confused when trying to calculate when was the best time to visit the bloke, how long the journey would take, how long my getting ready would take and what time that I needed to get up at. After all you work backwards when trying to do these things, which can sometimes very difficult for me. So I lost track of 60 minutes somewhere.

Notice I’m using the words ‘I’ and ‘me’ instead of ‘my brain’ because my brain isn’t some dysfunctioning separate entity. So when…

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