* What a relief!

I survived ear surgery- what a relief!

The adventure began with 2 pre-op visits the day before.  The primary focus of the 1st one was accurately saying my name and birthdate.  I did that successfully multiple times- what a relief!  The 2nd appointment was with representatives of the actual procedure (Eustachian tube dilation).   Everyone was kind, professional, and helpful- what a relief!

The anesthesiologist made sure I could twist my head and jaw like a zombie, which I could- what a relief!  The nurse told me I might wake up the next day with liquid all over my face but not to worry, because it would be blood.  (Had she been consulting with the anesthesiologist?)  I had no liquid of any kind- what a relief!  I was given a special antibacterial soap to use twice before surgery, from “chin to toes,” in case any body parts got near my surgical site.  I am unable to touch my ear with my toes- what a relief!

I was first on the surgical schedule- what a relief!  My surgeon’s resident dropped by to tell me that they would be “moving a bone,” which I already knew from insurance papers that listed “nasal bone fracture.”  I laughed and asked if I would still be able to sing like Barbra Streisand.  He looked blank (who is Barbra Streisand and why did she refuse a nose job??)  I trilled a few soprano notes off-key and he said (dubiously) I should be fine- what a relief!

They gave me hot blankets- what a relief!  I was rolled to surgery and I could see their eyes smiling- what a relief!  The anesthesiologist gave me some falling asleep medicine and I said, “I can feel it working.  I’m falling asleep.”  Then I couldn’t breathe so I choked out, “I can’t breathe!”  She asked me, “What did you say?”  I repeated it and tried the universal choking sign, only one hand was laden with tubes.  I managed to make the sign twice with my right hand, desperate for air.  I looked up at the monitors for signs that I wasn’t getting air, but without my glasses, it was too blurry.  No one seemed concerned so why should I be?  I knew I’d be intubated and surely they would do it quickly.  They must have- what a relief!  

I woke up chatty and happy, being told by a sweet nurse that I’d already been talking for 15 minutes.  Apparently I didn’t say anything alarming- what a relief!  In fact, I told her once again about the dream I was having.  And asked her name for the trillionth time.

I discovered that smart surgeons use visual aids, as evidenced by the drawings on my ear and neck.  I teach all my kiddos to use them- what a relief!

ear

22 thoughts on “* What a relief!

  1. Here’s hoping you have a fast recovery – you should! You are young! I had an inner ear evacuation without anaesthesia once – no fun at all, felt like I would die. So lots of good thoughts and energy coming your way!

    Liked by 1 person

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